Top Plant

As we emerge from an almost unprecedented recession, we need a blueprint for how to move forward. A great example of what manufacturing can and should look like going forward is reflected in the 2009 Top Plant recipient: Siemens Industry Inc.’s Norwood, OH facility represents both the storied past of manufacturing as well as its future.
December 1, 2009

As we emerge from an almost unprecedented recession, we need a blueprint for how to move forward. A great example of what manufacturing can and should look like going forward is reflected in the 2009 Top Plant recipient:

  • A global manufacturer who can choose to build their product anywhere in the world

  • A skilled, experienced workforce that has adapted to the changes in markets and technology

  • A Rust Belt manufacturer that has been both reinvested in and reinvented over the last five years

  • A manufacturing operation that recognizes that the battle is not between management and labor, but between their company and their competition.

    • Plant Engineering December 2009 cover

      Plant Engineering December 2009 cover

      Siemens Industry Inc.’s Norwood, OH facility represents both the storied past of manufacturing as well as its future. It is third-generation workers are walking much the same path as their ancestors, but with new equipment and new focus on its place in the organization and in the world. They make motors that drive the manufacturing operations of others, and those motors literally drive the engine of manufacturing in their community.

       

      Productivity, safety, efficiency and quality are the bywords of manufacturing. They are the measuring stick that determines where and how a product is manufactured. These are not matters of cost or profit, but of excellence. As Siemens’ Norwood, OH facility shows us again this year, excellence is its own reward, but it also rewards those who invest in it.