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PPE

Courtesy: Ben Cyr and Dr. Sara Rampazzi, University of Michigan
Sensors, Vision July 7, 2020

Wireless sensors for N95 masks could enable more accurate decontamination

University of Michigan researchers are developing tiny wireless sensors for recycled N95 masks could verify, in real time, whether the respirators are being exposed to proper decontamination conditions

By Zach Champion
Some health care professionals are experiencing a shortage of personal protective equipment, such as N95 respirators. Courtesy: David Staack, Texas A&M University
PPE June 30, 2020

Researchers develop method to recycle PPE using radiation

Texas A&M University researchers have developed a method to make PPE masks reusable by sending them through an electron beam facility to get rid of contaminants.

By Laura Simmons
Courtesy: Dewberry
Process Safety June 26, 2020

COVID-19’s impact on wastewater treatment facilities

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major effect on wastewater treatment facilities from many perspectives including maintenance, operations and safety.

By Patrick Radabaugh
A Purdue University team has come up with an approach to extend the shelf life for an N95 PPE mask being used by health care and other essential workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Courtesy: Chris Vavra, CFE Media
PPE June 23, 2020

Researchers develop approach to make N95 masks last longer

A Purdue University research team is working on extending the shelf life for an N95 mask, a crucial piece of personal protective equipment (PPE), by making the elastic band last longer.

By Chris Adam
Northwestern researchers have developed a device that monitors early signs, disease progression and response to treatment to COVID-19. Courtesy: Northwestern University
Sensors, Vision June 21, 2020

Wearable COVID-19 sensor receives research grant

A Northwestern research team received a $200,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to continue developing a novel wearable device and set of algorithms specifically tailored to catch early signs and monitor progression of COVID-19.

By Amanda Morris
A project to develop smart faces masks to assess proper fit and monitor health has received an NSF RAPID grant. Courtesy: Northwestern University
PPE June 18, 2020

Smart COVID-19 PPE mask project receives research grant

Northwestern Engineering researchers received a $200,000 grant from the NSF to develop smart personal protective equipment (PPE) masks embedded with battery-free sensors to assess health for the COVID-19 pandemic.

By Amanda Morris
Courtesy: Formlabs/West Virginia University
PPE June 3, 2020

University working with 3D-printing developer to produce swabs for COVID-19 testing

The Innovation Hub at West Virginia University is working with a Massachusetts-based 3D-printing company to produce medical swabs for COVID-19 testing.

By Jake Stump
Courtesy: Cincinnati Incorporated/Steve Rourke, CFE Media and Technology
Safety May 31, 2020

Staying safe in the “new normal” of COVID-19

As companies and manufacturers start to re-open in the near future, health and safety is a top priority.

By Gregory Hale
A team from Northwestern Engineering has found a way to retrofit a common commercial emergency ventilator (Vortran Go2Vent) into a device better suited for COVID-19 patients. Courtesy: Northwestern University
PPE May 27, 2020

Engineers adapt emergency ventilators for COVID-19 patients

Engineers at Northwestern University has found a way to retrofit a common commercial emergency ventilator into a device better-suited for COVID-19 patients.

By Amanda Morris
Engineers from MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have come up with a new approach to sharing ventilators between patients, which they believe could be used as a last resort to treat Covid-19 patients in acute respiratory distress. Courtesy: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Safety May 27, 2020

Engineers propose safer method for sharing ventilators during COVID-19 pandemic

MIT engineers have proposed a suggested design could make it easier to divide air flow for COVID-19 patients in emergencies when no other options are available.

By Anne Trafton