Reader Forum – 2001-12-01

Joining in the pipe joining discussionAs a product development engineer at Ridge Tool, a leading producer of tools for pipe joining, I read with interest your article on pipe joining in the October 2001 issue of PLANT ENGINEERING. I would like to offer the following comments on the article. First, you list grooved fittings as being a permanent type of joint.

By Staff December 1, 2001

Joining in the pipe joining discussion

As a product development engineer at Ridge Tool, a leading producer of tools for pipe joining, I read with interest your article on pipe joining in the October 2001 issue of PLANT ENGINEERING. I would like to offer the following comments on the article. First, you list grooved fittings as being a permanent type of joint. This is not true. By removing any two adjacent couplings, the piece of pipe or fitting between them can be removed. This makes installation of branch lines or replacement of a specified piece of pipe or fitting much simpler than threaded pipe, which you list as detachable.

Also, your article indicated that crimped fittings can be used for up to 2-in. O.D. material. Currently, Ridge Tool, in conjunction with Viega, sells fittings and crimping equipment for1/ 2 in. through 4 in. copper tubes, types K, L, and M. — James Hamm, PE, Sr. Development Engineer, Ridge Tool Co.

National Engineers Week upcoming

Today’s kids represent the future of engineering.

Why not stir up their interest now in engineering, technology, and science? That’s the main objective of National Engineers Week 2002, slated to run from Feb. 17-23. This year, the focus is to implement a nationwide training program for volunteer engineers to work with 6 to 11-year olds. The plan to target this age bracket is in cooperation with WGNH-TV in Boston, producer of “Zoom,” a PBS program.

National Engineers Week will help supply content for three “Zoom” episodes exploring Structures, Kitchen Chemistry, and Biomes. For more information, call the National Engineers Week Headquarters at 703-684-2852 or visit the web site at eweek.org