Safety Standards

Safety Standards February 1, 1998

What You Can’t See Can Hurt You — How To Reduce Risk In Confined Spaces

Confined spaces are an exception to the rule that you should never assume anything in life. In this case, always assume the worst -- that the space contains an unseen, unexpected hazard.

By Stephen Bayer, Product Group Manager, Portable Instruments, MSA, Pittsburgh, PA; and Stephen Bayer; Alfred W. Keiss
Safety Standards February 1, 1998

Proper Steam Hose Selection Leads To Performance, Safety, And Economic Benefits

There are powerful economic and safety reasons for properly specifying and handling steam hose assemblies.

By Howard Aspinall
Safety Standards January 1, 1998

It’s Greek to me

Have you ever tried to read an OSHA regulation, only to find that it's completely undecipherable? That's the conclusion James Stanley, former deputy assistant secretary of OSHA, has reached.

By Staff
Safety Standards January 1, 1998

Using An Ergonomic Approach To Moving Material Safely

Over 1 million lower back injuries occur in the workplace each year, costing industry billions of dollars in workers' compensation claims, legal fees, lost time and production, and medical costs.

By Ron Holzhauer
Safety Standards January 1, 1970

Literature Offers

Network grounding systemsA 60-p catalog covers copper and mechanical grounding components for network applications. The publication provides features, benefits, and complete specifications, including materials, dimensions, sizes, part numbers, and illustrations. Information charts and a cross-reference guide are included in the literature.

By Staff
Safety Standards January 1, 1970

Electro-pneumatic transducer

Converts milliamp input signals to a switch-selectable proportional pneumatic output signal for lower pneumatic supply consumption and reduced operating costs. The i2P-100 combines all ATEX and IECEx approvals onto one nameplate, enabling users that require ATEX approvals to select and mark the protection method (intrinsic safety, flameproof, or type n), upon installation of the unit.

By Staff
Safety Standards January 1, 1970

Product Intros – 1970-01-01

Rack design reduces forklift damageThe Defender rack frame can be applied to new and existing installations to resist and reduce forklift damage. The front column is moved back 9-in. from the aisle to reduce forklift contact. The bottom front column is made of tubular steel with a 3/16-in. thick wall to take more abuse than other racks.

By Staff