Reader response

Buying new chuck keys is best solution I am surprised that you published a tip on using screwdrivers to replace a lost chuck key. All I could see when I read the tip was a screwdriver sticking in the back of someone's hand. To do what is proposed takes one hand for the slotted screwdriver, one hand for the Phillips, and one hand to hold the drill.
By Staff September 15, 2002

Buying new chuck keys is best solution

I am surprised that you published a tip on using screwdrivers to replace a lost chuck key. All I could see when I read the tip was a screwdriver sticking in the back of someone’s hand. To do what is proposed takes one hand for the slotted screwdriver, one hand for the Phillips, and one hand to hold the drill. Most of us were only issued two hands. A far safer approach would be to borrow the appropriate chuck key from a workmate and then go buy two new ones (keeping one for a spare) at the earliest opportunity. — M.J.M.

• The lost chuck key solution published in the August issue would earn anybody who uses this method in our plant a safety citation for using tools incorrectly and for the wrong job. Screwdrivers are not designed to be used as pry bars, and since the tools are not guided, there is a high risk of slipping, which can lead to serious injuries on the hand. Chuck keys can be purchased as replacement parts, and they are a lot cheaper than having to deal with an injured employee. — Dr. Wolfgang Decker

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