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Dangerous tip With over 20 years in industry, I have accumulated a binder of useful Tips & Tricks for just about any situation. The Tip (#230) in your August issue is one of the most dangerous you can attempt. Striking two hardened surfaces together like that of the ball peen hammers is an invitation to disaster.
By Staff September 10, 2004

Dangerous tip

With over 20 years in industry, I have accumulated a binder of useful Tips & Tricks for just about any situation. The Tip (#230) in your August issue is one of the most dangerous you can attempt. Striking two hardened surfaces together like that of the ball peen hammers is an invitation to disaster. Striking hardened steel together could cause a fracture, sending a broken piece flying like shrapnel. This shrapnel could cause damage even at a distance. I know from experience.

A mechanic on my staff was doing something almost identical to what is described. I was standing about 8 feet from that work area when I heard the sound of steel on steel. Within a fraction of a second, I felt a sting on the right side of my neck. The impact of the two hammers caused a piece to break away and become a missile. Needless to say, I needed surgery to remove the steel from my neck. Luckily, it missed the artery. In my opinion this “Tip” is in no way an award winner but should have its dangers exposed.

I find your magazine a wealth of information covering many topics. I look forward to the topics that are discussed in “Human Side.” I use them as a teaching tool for junior supervisors. You would be surprised at the variety of responses you’ll get.

J.F. Hartman

Switched leads

While scanning through the July 2004 issue of PLANT ENGINEERING I happened to notice the article on the use of digital multimeters.

Some of your readers may be confused when referring to Fig. 3. The text does not agree with the figure. The text suggests connecting the red lead to the anode and the black lead to the cathode.

The figure shows a black lead on the anode and a red lead on the cathode. Upon closer inspection, it appears that the connection in the figure is actually correct but the lead colors are swapped.

Typically, one would connect the black lead to the COM terminal on the meter and the red lead to the Volt/Ohm terminal.

Also, Fig. 2 is similar in that the lead colors on the meter are swapped.

Walter Fisher