OSHA puts 14,000 employers on notice for high injury rates

The easiest way to reduce workers comp costs is not to have injuries in the first place, which is the point OSHA hopes to make with approximately 14,000 letters sent during March to employers, letting them know their injury and illness rates at their worksites are higher than average. OSHA is also offering assistance to help businesses fix safety and health hazards, which is also less expensiv...
By Staff April 1, 2005

The easiest way to reduce workers comp costs is not to have injuries in the first place, which is the point OSHA hopes to make with approximately 14,000 letters sent during March to employers, letting them know their injury and illness rates at their worksites are higher than average.

OSHA is also offering assistance to help businesses fix safety and health hazards, which is also less expensive than OSHA fines.

In a letter to those employers, acting OSHA administrator Jonathan Snare said the notification was what OSHA called “a proactive step to encourage employers to take steps now to reduce those rates and improve the safety and health environment in their workplaces.”

“This identification process is meant to raise awareness that injuries and illnesses are high at these facilities,” Snare said. “Injuries and illnesses are costly to employers in both personal and financial terms. Our goal is to identify workplaces where injury and illness rates are high, and to offer assistance to employers so they can address the hazards and reduce occupational injuries and illnesses.”

The companies contacted by OSHA all had 6.5 or more injuries for every 100 fulltime workers that caused days away from work, restricted work activity or a job transfer. Than injury rate is more than double the national average of 2.6 injuries per 100 full-time workers.

While the companies already know who they are, everyone else can view the list of 14,000 sites. It is on OSHA’s web site at: www.osha.gov .