Crockpot supporters

I just finished reading your editorial {"Microwaves and crock pots," Feb. 2003} and wanted to write to tell you I agree. There is one difference of opinion that I have, and it concerns the use of the word "urgent" when you were discussing root cause analysis. I have often used the term, "the tyranny of the urgent.
By Staff March 15, 2003

I just finished reading your editorial {“Microwaves and crock pots,”

Feb. 2003} and wanted to write to tell you I agree. There is one difference of opinion that I have, and it concerns the use of the word “urgent” when you were discussing root cause analysis. I have often used the term, “the tyranny of the urgent.” It seems we have time for the “urgent” items but no time for the “important” items. I would class root cause analysis as an “important” activity that is often neglected in favor of “urgent” activities. Just a matter of semantics.

Thanks for pointing out the need to stop and think. Like your pastor, I, too, am a “crockpot” guy, though many might spell that “crack pot” when it applies to me. — Michael R. Dunlap

You have really hit the nail on the head with your comments about today’s fascination with one speed — fast. We seem to be becoming so obsessed with speed that we are starting to believe that even our leisure time must be fast! We seem to be forgetting that not everything must be done at the speed of light. — Jay Thornton

You’re showing your age… All the wisdom reflected in your editorial shows clearly that you’ve been “around the block” a few times! “Fast is better” is another flawed business mantra that lacks substance when you really think about it, as you did so well. Thank goodness there are a few “crockpots” like yourself that realize that everything in life is not a crisis and most good things take a certain amount of time — like babies! Thanks for another insightful editorial. — Carl DeCasper