Break out of the break-fix mentality

Enterprise asset management an important tool for improvement, says Aberdeen/Plant Engineering report
By Plant Engineering Staff July 10, 2008

Manufacturers looking to improve the return on their assets need to break out of the‘break-fix mentality’ and embrace structured maintenance programs driven by an enterprise asset management system.

That’s the primary finding in a new study conducted with the Aberdeen Group and Plant Engineering magazine released this week. The study found that best-in-class manufacturers are twice as likely to establish continuous improvement teams and to standardize processes across the plant floor.

“Best-in-class companies are using enterprise asset management strategies to reduce operational cost, improve profitability and hence improve the competitive edge in the marketplace,” said study author Mehul Shah.

Those manufacturers using EAM realize 93% overall equipment effectiveness (OEE), 97% plant throughput and just 3% asset downtime , according to the study report. Laggards in those categories experience just 67% OEE, 74% throughput and 34% asset downtime.

“Aberdeen Group findings indicate that the adoption level of EAM solutions has increased since last year for manufacturers across the three categories of performance,” Shah said. “This truly highlights the importance of looking at asset management at an enterprise level.”

Even so, the move toward structured maintenance programs is still woefully behind. The Aberdeen Group study found that only 40% of best-in-class manufacturers had implemented a reliability-centered maintenance approach. A Plant Engineering study last year found that 60% of manufacturers had no maintenance program of any kind working on their plant floor.

Another area of success was found in mobile devices . Best-in-class manufacturers were 1.5 times more likely to integrate mobile devices with their asset management systems, and were 30% more likely to use those devices to initiate work orders from the mobile devices without going back to their work stations.

Full details of the study are now available at the Aberdeen Group Website or at www.plantengineering.com .