Better business strategies will drive job growth

I found it quite ironic that your January issue of PLANT ENGINEERING arrived at my office on Monday Jan. 23. On page 52, Kim Hill has the following quote. "The looming skilled labor shortage is the single most important issue the US automobile industry will be facing in the next five to 10 years." It just so happened that Jan.
By Staff February 1, 2006

I found it quite ironic that your January issue of PLANT ENGINEERING arrived at my office on Monday Jan. 23.

On page 52, Kim Hill has the following quote. “The looming skilled labor shortage is the single most important issue the US automobile industry will be facing in the next five to 10 years.”

It just so happened that Jan. 23 is when Ford announced its latest reorganization, cutting up to 30,000 jobs and closing 14 plants. I guess all the personnel that Ford will be letting go over the next two to six years won’t cover the shortfall.

It seems to me that the potential labor shortage if it really exists at all, is a result of people deciding not to enter technical fields because of the never-ending stream of downsizing announcements from large manufacturing firms. The failure of these organizations to effectively implement business strategies that provide growth potential is a much more serious issue.

If they don’t solve the problems behind their loss of market share we will continue to see downsizing announcements and there won’t be a skilled labor shortage because the US manufacturing industry (automotive or otherwise) won’t need those workers.

Leonard Riker

Powders Production Manger

Henkel Corporation

Olean, NY