AAM study, video details problems of dumping

A study released May 22 by the Alliance for American Manufacturing gives a first-of-its-kind look at the consequences of predatory trade practices on workers, manufacturers and their communities, and emphasizes the economic benefit of enforcing U.S. trade laws. The study, “Enforcing the Rules,” provides an analysis of 10 recent cases in which anti-dumping or countervailing duties ha...
By Staff June 15, 2007

A study released May 22 by the Alliance for American Manufacturing gives a first-of-its-kind look at the consequences of predatory trade practices on workers, manufacturers and their communities, and emphasizes the economic benefit of enforcing U.S. trade laws.

The study, “Enforcing the Rules,” provides an analysis of 10 recent cases in which anti-dumping or countervailing duties have been imposed to combat illegally dumped and subsidized imports in industries including shrimp, steel and furniture-making. The study has an accompanying video on the subject.

“When our trade laws are enforced, the contributions to the economy actually outweigh any of the so-called benefits of the dumped or subsidized imports by more than 50 times,” said Scott N. Paul, AAM’s executive director.

“To get the true picture of the impact of dumping and subsidies, you have to look at the overall ripple effect on the economy, on the companies, on related industry sectors and on workers,” said Greg Mastel, one of the authors of the study.

For more details, or to view the video, visit the Alliance for American Manufacturing Website at www.americanmanufacturing.org , or by going to the news section at www.PlantEngineering.com .