Successful load testing of 36.5 MW superconductor ship propulsion motor

American Superconductor Corporation and Northrop Grumman completed successful full-power testing of the world’s first 36.5 MW (49,000 hp) high-temperature superconductor (HTS) ship propulsion motor. Link to some HTS videos and history.


Some HTS history

HTS magnetic bearings

HTS wire developments

Washington, DC – A new era in ship propulsion technology was launched as American Superconductor Corporation and Northrop Grumman announced the successful completion of full-power testing of the world’s first 36.5 MW (49,000 hp) high-temperature superconductor (HTS) ship propulsion motor at the U.S. Navy’s Integrated Power System Land-Based Test Site in Philadelphia. The first successful full-power test of an electric propulsion motor sized for a large Navy combatant, at 36.5 MW, doubled the Navy’s power rating test record.

American Superconductor videos tell how high temperature superconducting motors are used for ship propulsion .

Designed and built under a contract from the Office of Naval Research, the system points to HTS motors as the primary propulsion technology for future Navy all-electric ships and submarines. Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) funded and led testing.
Incorporating coils of HTS wire that carry 150 times the power of similar-sized copper wire, the motor is less than half the size of conventional motors used on the first two DDG-1000 hulls and reduces ship weight by approximately 200 metric tons. New ships will be more fuel-efficient and can free up space for other uses.
“The successful load test of our HTS motor marks the beginning of a new era in ship propulsion technology,” said Dan McGahn, senior vice president and general manager of AMSC Superconductors. “This motor provides the U.S. Navy with a truly transformational capability relative to size, stealth, endurance and survivability, providing our Navy with a clear performance advantage for years to come. We are grateful for the steadfast support from the Office of Naval Research, Naval Sea Systems Command and the Naval Surface Warfare Center.”
AMSC and Northrop Grumman shared the work under a business agreement, with AMSC serving as prime contractor for research and development. The superconductor motors are now ready for deployment:
“HTS technology offers the Navy a power-dense propulsion solution, and it will save money,” said Donna Potter, director of the Development & Integration business at Northrop Grumman’s Sunnyvale, CA-based Marine Systems business unit. “Whether the Navy uses the size and weight savings to make ships lighter and more fuel-efficient, or to pack more capabilities onto fewer ships, the end result is the same: more capability for the warfighter at less cost to the taxpayer.”
Earlier last year, the Navy successfully installed another HTS system– an HTS degaussing coil – onboard the USS HIGGINS (DDG 76). Powered by AMSC HTS wire and magnet cable technology, the coil system will undergo sea trials during the next two years onboard the HIGGINS. Degaussing coils using HTS wire will reduce system weight for DDG 1000-class ships, landing platform dock (LPD) ships, and Littoral Combat Ships (LCS).
The Navy has invested more than $100 million in the development of HTS technology, paving the way not only for use in Navy ships but also in commercial vessels, such as cruise liners and liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers.
A bit of HTS history
Back in 2006, CE editor Frank Bartos wrote about the Hannover Fair Research & Technology sector, which that year included a special group exhibit entitled "SuperConducting City," where motor and drive innovations played an inherent part. Notable offerings included high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic bearings from Siemens and Nexans Superconductors GmbH, destined for high-speed drives and rotating equipment. Those contactless, low-loss, and wear-free bearings were projected to see service in motors and generators in the 2010 timeframe. Read also: HTS wire development update .
Northrop Grumman
American Superconductor

–  Control Engineering News Desk
Register here .

No comments
The Top Plant program honors outstanding manufacturing facilities in North America. View the 2015 Top Plant.
The Product of the Year program recognizes products newly released in the manufacturing industries.
The Engineering Leaders Under 40 program identifies and gives recognition to young engineers who...
Safety for 18 years, warehouse maintenance tips, Ethernet and the IIoT, GAMS 2016 recap
2016 Engineering Leaders Under 40; Future vision: Where is manufacturing headed?; Electrical distribution, redefined
Strategic outsourcing delivers efficiency; Sleeve bearing clearance; Causes of water hammer; Improve air quality; Maintenance safety; GAMS preview
SCADA at the junction, Managing risk through maintenance, Moving at the speed of data
Safety at every angle, Big Data's impact on operations, bridging the skills gap
The digital oilfield: Utilizing Big Data can yield big savings; Virtualization a real solution; Tracking SIS performance
Applying network redundancy; Overcoming loop tuning challenges; PID control and networks
Driving motor efficiency; Preventing arc flash in mission critical facilities; Integrating alternative power and existing electrical systems
Package boilers; Natural gas infrared heating; Thermal treasure; Standby generation; Natural gas supports green efforts

Annual Salary Survey

Before the calendar turned, 2016 already had the makings of a pivotal year for manufacturing, and for the world.

There were the big events for the year, including the United States as Partner Country at Hannover Messe in April and the 2016 International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago in September. There's also the matter of the U.S. presidential elections in November, which promise to shape policy in manufacturing for years to come.

But the year started with global economic turmoil, as a slowdown in Chinese manufacturing triggered a worldwide stock hiccup that sent values plummeting. The continued plunge in world oil prices has resulted in a slowdown in exploration and, by extension, the manufacture of exploration equipment.

Read more: 2015 Salary Survey

Maintenance and reliability tips and best practices from the maintenance and reliability coaches at Allied Reliability Group.
The One Voice for Manufacturing blog reports on federal public policy issues impacting the manufacturing sector. One Voice is a joint effort by the National Tooling and Machining...
The Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals an organization devoted...
Join this ongoing discussion of machine guarding topics, including solutions assessments, regulatory compliance, gap analysis...
IMS Research, recently acquired by IHS Inc., is a leading independent supplier of market research and consultancy to the global electronics industry.
Maintenance is not optional in manufacturing. It’s a profit center, driving productivity and uptime while reducing overall repair costs.
The Lachance on CMMS blog is about current maintenance topics. Blogger Paul Lachance is president and chief technology officer for Smartware Group.
This article collection contains several articles on the vital role of plant safety and offers advice on best practices.
This article collection contains several articles on the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and how it is transforming manufacturing.
This article collection contains several articles on strategic maintenance and understanding all the parts of your plant.
click me