NEMA offers guidance on water-damaged electrical equipment

Many regions have been hit with flooding, and even professionals may need to seek guidance about if electrical equipment exposed to water should be reconditioned or replaced. Experts offer free advice.

06/27/2008


Rosslyn, VA – Many regions have been hit with flooding, and even professionals may need to seek guidance on whether or not electrical equipment exposed to water should be reconditioned or replaced. A National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) publication, Evaluating Water-Damaged Electrical Equipment , provides guidance about replacement or reconditioning of


NEMA Resources
Many resources are available from NEMA at www.nema.org , including the following:

About NEMA Standards
How NEMA Standards Are Developed
How to Purchase a NEMA Standard
How to Read a NEMA Standard
Technical FAQs
Codes and Standards Committee
Codes & Standards Members
Manual (.doc)
Engineering Bulletins
Field Representative Program
National Electrical Code
Adoption of the National Electrical Code
Code Alerts
Member Benefits
Meet a Field Representative
Code Enforcement Officials
NEMA Policies and Strategies
Patent Disclosure Policy
NTCIP
The ABCs of Conformity Assessment
Conformity Assessment and Market Access Consulting Service
Conformity Assessment Guide Online
FAQs: Product Certification and testing
IECEE CB Scheme
IECEx Scheme
Useful Links: Product Testing & Certification
Standards by Document Number Standards by Title
Popular Acronyms

The NEMA publication instructs maintenance workers, electrical inspectors, electricians, building owners, and users of electrical products on how to evaluate electrical equipment that has been exposed to water through flooding, fire-fighting activities, and hurricanes. A table shows requirements and recommendations associated with categories of electrical equipment that have been water-damaged, useful for system integrators, original equipment manufacturers, end-users, and distributors of such equipment.
Such equipment can be hazardous if reenergized without proper reconditioning or replacement. Reductions in integrity of equipment due to moisture can affect performance. Damage can result from flood waters contaminated with chemicals, sewage, oil, and other debris. Ocean water and salt spray can be particularly damaging due to the corrosive and conductive nature of salt water residue. Distributors should not supply inventory that has been water-damaged. A working knowledge of electrical systems and equipment is needed to evaluate such damage due to contact with water.

The original manufacturer should be contacted with questions or if recommendations are needed. Following damage, replacement may be necessary. After consulting the manufacturer, some larger types of electrical equipment may be reconditioned by properly trained personnel.
What itemsc products including signaling, protection, communication systems, industrial controls, and cable trays. 
For instance,
Transformers – Exposure of transformers to water can cause corrosion and insulation damage to the transformer core and winding. Ability of the transformer to perform its intended function in a safe manner can also be impaired by debris and chemicals, which may be deposited inside the transformer during a flood. Water and contaminates will also damage the transformer fluids.
Cable tray – Carefully inspect the cable tray system to determine if its mechanical and / or electrical integrity has been compromised. Repair or replace any damaged portions per original installation requirements. Remove all debris from the cable tray. If any labels warning against the use of the cable trayas a walkway have been damaged, obtain new labels from the manufacturer and apply as required.
Power equipment – Replace fusible units of fused equipment. The remainder of the apparatus may be suitable for refurbishing in close consultation with the manufacturer. In all cases, great attention must be paid to the thorough cleaning, drying, and testing of insulators and insulation material.
NEMA provides copies of the document to electrical inspectors, building officials, and field representatives are making copies available during visits to the Midwest and other communities across the U.S. NEMA is inviting organizations such as International Code Council and National Joint Apprenticeship and Training Program of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers to make the free document available to constituents.
A complimentary copy of NEMA's Evaluating Water-Damaged Electrical Equipment
Control Engineering News Desk
Register here and scroll down to select your choice of eNewsletters free .





No comments
The Top Plant program honors outstanding manufacturing facilities in North America. View the 2015 Top Plant.
The Product of the Year program recognizes products newly released in the manufacturing industries.
The Engineering Leaders Under 40 program identifies and gives recognition to young engineers who...
2015 Top Plant: Phoenix Contact, Middletown, Pa.; 2015 Best Practices: Automation, Electrical Safety, Electrical Systems, Pneumatics, Material Handling, Mechanical Systems
A cool solution: Collaboration, chemistry leads to foundry coat product development; See the 2015 Product of the Year Finalists
Raising the standard: What's new with NFPA 70E; A global view of manufacturing; Maintenance data; Fit bearings properly
Special report: U.S. natural gas; LNG transport technologies evolve to meet market demand; Understanding new methane regulations; Predictive maintenance for gas pipeline compressors
Cyber security cost-efficient for industrial control systems; Extracting full value from operational data; Managing cyber security risks
Drilling for Big Data: Managing the flow of information; Big data drilldown series: Challenge and opportunity; OT to IT: Creating a circle of improvement; Industry loses best workers, again
Migrating industrial networks; Tracking HMI advances; Making the right automation changes
Understanding transfer switch operation; Coordinating protective devices; Analyzing NEC 2014 changes; Cooling data centers
Upgrading secondary control systems; Keeping enclosures conditioned; Diagnostics increase equipment uptime; Mechatronics simplifies machine design

Annual Salary Survey

After almost a decade of uncertainty, the confidence of plant floor managers is soaring. Even with a number of challenges and while implementing new technologies, there is a renewed sense of optimism among plant managers about their business and their future.

The respondents to the 2014 Plant Engineering Salary Survey come from throughout the U.S. and serve a variety of industries, but they are uniform in their optimism about manufacturing. This year’s survey found 79% consider manufacturing a secure career. That’s up from 75% in 2013 and significantly higher than the 63% figure when Plant Engineering first started asking that question a decade ago.

Read more: 2014 Salary Survey: Confidence rises amid the challenges

Maintenance and reliability tips and best practices from the maintenance and reliability coaches at Allied Reliability Group.
The One Voice for Manufacturing blog reports on federal public policy issues impacting the manufacturing sector. One Voice is a joint effort by the National Tooling and Machining...
The Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals an organization devoted...
Join this ongoing discussion of machine guarding topics, including solutions assessments, regulatory compliance, gap analysis...
IMS Research, recently acquired by IHS Inc., is a leading independent supplier of market research and consultancy to the global electronics industry.
Maintenance is not optional in manufacturing. It’s a profit center, driving productivity and uptime while reducing overall repair costs.
The Lachance on CMMS blog is about current maintenance topics. Blogger Paul Lachance is president and chief technology officer for Smartware Group.
This article collection contains several articles on the vital role that compressed air plays in manufacturing plants.