Machine Safety: Robotic Industries Association updates safety requirements for robots

Robotic Industries Association (RIA) has announced its updated ANSI/RIA R15.06-2012 standard. This first update since 1999 (now harmonized with the international standard ISO 10218:2011) is a major step forward for users and manufacturers of robotics in the U.S.

06/01/2013


Robotic Industries Association (RIA) announced its updated ANSI/RIA R15.06-2012 standard for robotic safety. This is the first update since 1999 and it is now harmonized with the international standard ISO 10218:2011.

“Approved  March 28, 2013.  A revision of ANSI R15.06-1999, this standard provides guidelines for the manufacture and integration of Industrial Robots and Robot Systems with emphasis on their safe use, the importance of risk assessment and establishing personnel safety. This standard is a national adoption of the International Standards ISO 10218-1 and ISO 10218-2 for Industrial Robots and Robot Systems, and offers a global safety standard for the manufacture and integration of such systems.”

Wow, this is a major step forward for both robot manufacturers and users of robots in factory applications here in the US. It looks like this advancement means a departure from the previous seven risk reduction categories of; R1, R2A, R2B, R2C, R3A, R3B & R4 to the five Performance Level (PL) designations of PLa through PLe. Category levels (B, 1 --- 4) will be re-defined following ISO 13849-1: 2006 and applied for the architecture structure. These changes and others will definitely be improvements for robot manufacturers and systems integrators.

Robotic innovations, safety - April 2013 - Control Engineering cover photo courtesy: Universal Robots

Control Engineering April cover

story on robotics includes more

about robotic safety.

 


RIA robotic safety standard was discussed at Pack Expo 2012. Courtesy CFE MediaTo take a step back - does this mean that all of the additional requirements from ISO 13849-1 for “designers” will likewise be required for compliance to the updated ANSI/RIA R15.06-2012 standard?

If so, I guess the robot manufacturers, systems integrators and some end users, all of which have “designers,” will find a way to comply with the additional requirements. From an enforcement model comparison this seems to fall directly in line with the European Model. But, as I’ve previously blogged, what about the other half of industry here in the U.S., which doesn't have “designers” in their businesses? And, the U.S. enforcement model (OSHA) places the first responsibility for safety on the end user of machinery in contrast to the European model. If these end users (without designers) could follow 15.06: 1999 for compliance with OSHA will they also be able to follow 15.06: 2012?

If the answer to this question doesn’t have an easy answer, then what’s happened? It’s been my experience that U.S. standards bodies are reluctant to add new heavy requirements to “all” users of their standard in order to meet the overall intent of the updated standard. Is OSHA going to adopt the European enforcement model?

Can anyone help us out with this over-arching question for “all” user compliance?

Has this presented you with any new perspectives? Add your comments or thoughts to the discussion by submitting your ideas, experiences, and challenges in the comments section below.

J.B. Titus, CFSE

Related articles:

Inside Machines: Does adopting ISO 13849-1:2006 change the U.S. model for compliance and enforcement?

http://www.robotics.org/content-detail.cfm/Industrial-Robotics-News/New-Robot-Safety-Standard-Approved/content_id/4118

Machine Safety - updating ISO 13849-1 compliance for robots.

Updating Minds About Machine Safety

Machine Safety – does OSHA reference consensus standards for compliance?

Contact: http://www.jbtitus.com for “Solutions for Machine Safety”.



No comments
The Top Plant program honors outstanding manufacturing facilities in North America. View the 2013 Top Plant.
The Product of the Year program recognizes products newly released in the manufacturing industries.
The Leaders Under 40 program features outstanding young people who are making a difference in manufacturing. View the 2013 Leaders here.
The new control room: It's got all the bells and whistles - and alarms, too; Remote maintenance; Specifying VFDs
2014 forecast issue: To serve and to manufacture - Veterans will bring skill and discipline to the plant floor if we can find a way to get them there.
2013 Top Plant: Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio
Case Study Database

Case Study Database

Get more exposure for your case study by uploading it to the Plant Engineering case study database, where end-users can identify relevant solutions and explore what the experts are doing to effectively implement a variety of technology and productivity related projects.

These case studies provide examples of how knowledgeable solution providers have used technology, processes and people to create effective and successful implementations in real-world situations. Case studies can be completed by filling out a simple online form where you can outline the project title, abstract, and full story in 1500 words or less; upload photos, videos and a logo.

Click here to visit the Case Study Database and upload your case study.

Why manufacturers need to see energy in a different light: Current approaches to energy management yield quick savings, but leave plant managers searching for ways of improving on those early gains.
Electric motor power measurement and analysis: Understand the basics to drive greater efficiency; Selecting the right control chart; Linear position sensors gain acceptance
Protecting standby generators for mission critical facilities; Selecting energy-efficient transformers; Integrating power monitoring systems; Mitigating harmonics in electrical systems

Annual Salary Survey

Participate in the 2013 Salary Survey

In a year when manufacturing continued to lead the economic rebound, it makes sense that plant manager bonuses rebounded. Plant Engineering’s annual Salary Survey shows both wages and bonuses rose in 2012 after a retreat the year before.

Average salary across all job titles for plant floor management rose 3.5% to $95,446, and bonus compensation jumped to $15,162, a 4.2% increase from the 2010 level and double the 2011 total, which showed a sharp drop in bonus.

2012 Salary Survey Analysis

2012 Salary Survey Results

Maintenance and reliability tips and best practices from the maintenance and reliability coaches at Allied Reliability Group.
The One Voice for Manufacturing blog reports on federal public policy issues impacting the manufacturing sector. One Voice is a joint effort by the National Tooling and Machining...
The Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals an organization devoted...
Join this ongoing discussion of machine guarding topics, including solutions assessments, regulatory compliance, gap analysis...
IMS Research, recently acquired by IHS Inc., is a leading independent supplier of market research and consultancy to the global electronics industry.
Maintenance is not optional in manufacturing. It’s a profit center, driving productivity and uptime while reducing overall repair costs.
The Lachance on CMMS blog is about current maintenance topics. Blogger Paul Lachance is president and chief technology officer for Smartware Group.