I'm having a ball at work


Flash is required!

Get the right results, beyond doing

Accountable culture management asks, “Can we do this, have fun, and get results?” High-performance culture is a process, not an event. Some waitresses would get fired for dancing on a table with a customer on her birthday. At Hard Rock Café, it’s encouraged.

A systematic approach involves finding what ingredients create satisfied employees in your organization. How can you find the problem? You cannot reorganize your way out of a cultural performance issue.

Make a strategic plan. Goals should be aspire and be realistic. Stretch. Set clear expectations, make ways to score progress, and set timing along the way. Test the results. Are you winning? How do you know? How do you know when you’ve accomplished success?

Just crossing things off your “to do” list isn’t good enough.

Resource deployment differs depending on where in the game you are. If you’re behind, but have a plan, that still can be a good response. In any organization, it has to be clear, “How do you know when we accomplish success here?”

Productivity time, cost, quality, and output: Compare to others in your industry and others outside your industry. Avoid self-deception.

Consider continuous improvement versus a one-time goal. Among questions to ask: “What do we start or stop doing to improve X?” If there are time-management issues involved, be sure to start meetings on time. What will attending a meeting do to improve time, cost, quality, and output -> requisitions? (If nothing, don’t do the meeting.)

Energy + attitude = engagement. Ensure goals are realistic. “We’re expanding to Europe” (YAY!) “We’re leaving tomorrow.” (Yay.) “In a rowboat.” (I hate my job.)

Time management, measurements

Are those on your team energy takers or energy makers? Takers have a negative attitude and are unrealistic, with unclear goals and unspecific critiques. They whine, complain, and are unfocused. “I want to promote takers to my nearest competitor.”

Garnett asked if things like Facebook, YouTube, or American Idol are necessities or optional. You might not be as busy as you think you are. Take stock of time. Are the things you’re doing necessities?  Set your priorities. Do the right things. Think again and stop guessing: Measure. We think we know how we’re spending our time, and we don’t.

Pressure is external, and stress is internal. Put pressure on others to perform. That’s positive. Tell them the results you want. (Don’t create stress.)

Always say yes to a request, explaining what resources will be needed, and then be willing to look at the constraints to bring about the desired results. What changes are needed? Along the way, keep in mind that earning trust is hard. Re-earning it is harder.

Parting advice

Tips along the way:

  • Start, stop, and continue
  • Ownership = more questions
  • Maintain values and integrity
  • If it’s not fun, make a change or fire yourself
  • Don’t stop believing in the power of your people. 

Founded in 1994, the Control System Integrators Association (CSIA) is a not-for-profit, global professional association that seeks to advance the industry of control system integration. Control system integrators use engineering, technical, and business skills to help manufacturers and others automate industrial equipment and systems. CSIA members provide services for dozens of industries. Headquartered in Madison, Wis., CSIA helps members improve their business skills, provides a forum to share industry expertise, and promotes the benefits of hiring a certified control system integrator. CSIA has more than 400 member firms in 27 countries.

Mark T. Hoske is content manager, Control Engineering, CFE Media- Mark T. Hoske, content manager, CFE Media, Control Engineering, Plant Engineering, and Consulting-Specifying Engineer, with information from CSIA, mhoske@cfemedia.com.


This online version contains more information than the June 2013 Think Again column in the North American edition of Control Engineering. See also a video summary from Garnett, at top, and other coverage from the CSIA Executive conference, linked at the bottom



<< First < Previous 1 2 Next > Last >>

No comments
The Top Plant program honors outstanding manufacturing facilities in North America. View the 2015 Top Plant.
The Product of the Year program recognizes products newly released in the manufacturing industries.
The Engineering Leaders Under 40 program identifies and gives recognition to young engineers who...
Safety for 18 years, warehouse maintenance tips, Ethernet and the IIoT, GAMS 2016 recap
2016 Engineering Leaders Under 40; Future vision: Where is manufacturing headed?; Electrical distribution, redefined
Strategic outsourcing delivers efficiency; Sleeve bearing clearance; Causes of water hammer; Improve air quality; Maintenance safety; GAMS preview
SCADA at the junction, Managing risk through maintenance, Moving at the speed of data
Safety at every angle, Big Data's impact on operations, bridging the skills gap
The digital oilfield: Utilizing Big Data can yield big savings; Virtualization a real solution; Tracking SIS performance
Applying network redundancy; Overcoming loop tuning challenges; PID control and networks
Driving motor efficiency; Preventing arc flash in mission critical facilities; Integrating alternative power and existing electrical systems
Package boilers; Natural gas infrared heating; Thermal treasure; Standby generation; Natural gas supports green efforts

Annual Salary Survey

Before the calendar turned, 2016 already had the makings of a pivotal year for manufacturing, and for the world.

There were the big events for the year, including the United States as Partner Country at Hannover Messe in April and the 2016 International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago in September. There's also the matter of the U.S. presidential elections in November, which promise to shape policy in manufacturing for years to come.

But the year started with global economic turmoil, as a slowdown in Chinese manufacturing triggered a worldwide stock hiccup that sent values plummeting. The continued plunge in world oil prices has resulted in a slowdown in exploration and, by extension, the manufacture of exploration equipment.

Read more: 2015 Salary Survey

Maintenance and reliability tips and best practices from the maintenance and reliability coaches at Allied Reliability Group.
The One Voice for Manufacturing blog reports on federal public policy issues impacting the manufacturing sector. One Voice is a joint effort by the National Tooling and Machining...
The Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals an organization devoted...
Join this ongoing discussion of machine guarding topics, including solutions assessments, regulatory compliance, gap analysis...
IMS Research, recently acquired by IHS Inc., is a leading independent supplier of market research and consultancy to the global electronics industry.
Maintenance is not optional in manufacturing. It’s a profit center, driving productivity and uptime while reducing overall repair costs.
The Lachance on CMMS blog is about current maintenance topics. Blogger Paul Lachance is president and chief technology officer for Smartware Group.
This article collection contains several articles on the vital role of plant safety and offers advice on best practices.
This article collection contains several articles on the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and how it is transforming manufacturing.
This article collection contains several articles on strategic maintenance and understanding all the parts of your plant.
click me