Here's what you need to know about controls, says Automation Federation, U.S. government

Automation Competency Model is a formal U.S. document defining the skills and competencies needed in the automation field, which should lay a framework for filling the skills gap in controls and automation, Automation Federation and U.S. Department of Labor say.


Research Triangle Park, NC – The Automation Federation announced today the completion of the Automation Competency Model, a formal federal document defining the skills and competencies needed in the automation field. The Automation Federation worked with industry experts and representatives from the U.S. Department of Labor to develop the model over the course of several meetings, including face-to-face working sessions in Research Triangle Park, NC, and Houston, TX, the federation said.
The organization explained that the competency model describes what a person needs to know and be able to do– the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to perform well in an occupation. Competency models are developed through research and industry validation, and once completed, are promoted, maintained, and updated. The Automation Competency Model is made up of nine tiers, including personal effectiveness competencies, academic competencies, workplace competencies, industry-wide competencies, automation technical competencies, occupation-specific technical competencies, occupation-specific requirements, and management competencies.
Designed to help individuals prepare for job opportunities in the automation profession, the model will also help academic institutions updating curricula to better prepare the technology workforce of the future. Most importantly, it will provide a common language for the dialogue between the educators and executives who are working together to rebuild the workforce pipeline, which should lay a framework for filling the skills gap in controls and automation.
The Federation made a web seminar to introduce the Automation Competency Model to the workforce investment board system, educators, and employers through Workforce3 One, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration (ETA). Workforce3 One is an interactive communications and learning platform designed to build the capacity of the Workforce Investment System (WIS) to develop strategies that enable individuals to be successful in the 21st century economy. This platform provides online insight into the skills and competencies required by business and industry through the innovative workforce solutions identified by a wide range of strategic partners and grantees. Workforce3 One allows the workforce system, educators, business and industry, and others to share their innovative approaches, products, and tools and provides a vehicle for ETA to share information and products developed at the national level. View the web cast about the Automation Competency Model , after registering at the Workforce3 One site, there's a Webcast about the model.
“Completion of the Automation Competency Model is a huge step in our workforce development efforts to develop the next generation of automation professionals,” said Automation Federation chairman Steve Huffman. “The next step is for automation professionals, companies, and other organizations to join the Automation Federation’s efforts and help to spread this model throughout the United States. In addition, the Automation Federation will be working closely with similar organizations overseas to help define our profession around the globe in the coming years.”
Also read about

progress toward completing the

The Automation Federation describes itself as a global umbrella organization under which member associations and societies engaged in manufacturing and process automation activities can work more effectively to fulfill their missions, advance the science and engineering of automation technologies and applications and develop the workforce needed to capitalize on the benefits of automation.

– Edited by Mark T. Hoske , editor in chief
Control Engineering News Desk
Register here .

No comments
The Top Plant program honors outstanding manufacturing facilities in North America. View the 2013 Top Plant.
The Product of the Year program recognizes products newly released in the manufacturing industries.
The Engineering Leaders Under 40 program identifies and gives recognition to young engineers who...
A cool solution: Collaboration, chemistry leads to foundry coat product development; See the 2015 Product of the Year Finalists
Raising the standard: What's new with NFPA 70E; A global view of manufacturing; Maintenance data; Fit bearings properly
Sister act: Building on their father's legacy, a new generation moves Bales Metal Surface Solutions forward; Meet the 2015 Engineering Leaders Under 40
Cyber security cost-efficient for industrial control systems; Extracting full value from operational data; Managing cyber security risks
Drilling for Big Data: Managing the flow of information; Big data drilldown series: Challenge and opportunity; OT to IT: Creating a circle of improvement; Industry loses best workers, again
Pipeline vulnerabilities? Securing hydrocarbon transit; Predictive analytics hit the mainstream; Dirty pipelines decrease flow, production—pig your line; Ensuring pipeline physical and cyber security
Upgrading secondary control systems; Keeping enclosures conditioned; Diagnostics increase equipment uptime; Mechatronics simplifies machine design
Designing positive-energy buildings; Ensuring power quality; Complying with NFPA 110; Minimizing arc flash hazards
Building high availability into industrial computers; Of key metrics and myth busting; The truth about five common VFD myths

Annual Salary Survey

After almost a decade of uncertainty, the confidence of plant floor managers is soaring. Even with a number of challenges and while implementing new technologies, there is a renewed sense of optimism among plant managers about their business and their future.

The respondents to the 2014 Plant Engineering Salary Survey come from throughout the U.S. and serve a variety of industries, but they are uniform in their optimism about manufacturing. This year’s survey found 79% consider manufacturing a secure career. That’s up from 75% in 2013 and significantly higher than the 63% figure when Plant Engineering first started asking that question a decade ago.

Read more: 2014 Salary Survey: Confidence rises amid the challenges

Maintenance and reliability tips and best practices from the maintenance and reliability coaches at Allied Reliability Group.
The One Voice for Manufacturing blog reports on federal public policy issues impacting the manufacturing sector. One Voice is a joint effort by the National Tooling and Machining...
The Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals an organization devoted...
Join this ongoing discussion of machine guarding topics, including solutions assessments, regulatory compliance, gap analysis...
IMS Research, recently acquired by IHS Inc., is a leading independent supplier of market research and consultancy to the global electronics industry.
Maintenance is not optional in manufacturing. It’s a profit center, driving productivity and uptime while reducing overall repair costs.
The Lachance on CMMS blog is about current maintenance topics. Blogger Paul Lachance is president and chief technology officer for Smartware Group.