Fluke 233 Remote Display Multimeter allows wireless electrical measurement

Fluke 233 Digital Multimeter uses a 2.4 GHz ISM Band wireless transmitter to immediately send measurements to the detached display, improving safety and increasing productivity.


Fluke 233 Remote Display Multimeter

Fluke 233 Remote Display Multimeter brings wireless technology to contact electrical measurement.

For the first time, a multimeter will allow electricians and electronic technicians to work in two places at once, says Fluke Corp., provider of portable electronic test and measurement technology. Fluke introduced what it calls the industry's first digital multimeter with a detachable wireless display.

Designed by Fluke engineers and manufactured at the Fluke Worldwide headquarters in Everett, WA, the Fluke 233 Digital Multimeter uses a 2.4 GHz ISM Band wireless transmitter to send measurements to the detached display, improving safety and increasing productivity for today's busy industrial and commercial electricians and electronic technicians.

Flexible application

In addition to functioning as a highly capable multimeter, the new Fluke 233 Remote Display Multimeter gives users flexibility in unusual test situations. By sliding the wireless display out of the meter body, the user can place the display where it is most easily seen-up to 10 meters (33 feet) from the point of measurement- while putting the meter in the best position to take measurements. There's no more juggling of leads and the meter while stretching into tight spots. Fluke provides a video demonstration .

Designed for both convenience and safety, the Fluke 233 makes it easier to take measurements in hard-to-reach places, or make measurements in machines or panels that are physically separated from a limit or isolator switch. It is ideal in areas where the operator can't be close to the active measurement point, Fluke says, like clean rooms or hazardous areas. Making measurements without holding the meter can help users improve their visual focus on their test probes and work more safely.

Fluke says the detachable wireless display lets the user:

- Find a comfortable position to view and record test data, even when the test location is hard to reach or in a dirty or noisy environment.

- View readings when the test point is across the room-or in the next room.

- See test results even when the meter is hidden behind an equipment enclosure.

- Run tests and read results at a safe distance from shock and arc flash hazards, moving machinery and other dangers.

- Separate the tasks of positioning the meter and reading test results, allowing full attention on each job for increased safety.

The low-power, 2.4 GHz-ISM Band wireless signal that transmits measurement data is resistant to electromagnetic interference. The radio transmitter automatically turns on when the display is removed from the meter and off when the display is reattached. The removable display is magnetic and has a flat bottom, so it can be conveniently mounted or placed on a flat surface where it can easily be seen. When the display is attached, the Fluke 233 operates as a conventional multimeter.

The Fluke 233 will measure up to 1000 V ac and dc and up to 10 A. It features a 10,000μF capacitance range, measures frequencies to 50 kHz and captures min/max and average readings automatically. It features a 6,000-count display and includes a built-in thermometer that enables users to take temperature readings easily without carrying a separate instrument. The meter body is powered by three AA batteries; the display has two AA batteries. Average battery life is 400 hours. An auto-off feature maximizes battery life.

The Fluke 233 is safety rated for use in CAT IV 600V/CAT III 1000 V working environments.

Read more about Fluke from Control Engineering .

- Edited by Mark T. Hoske, editor in chief, Control Engineering www.controleng.com

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