Designing Efficient Schools: Case Study

Chicago Public School Mariano Azuela Elementary School

09/03/2010


Main Story                Design Strategies                LEED MEP Related Credits                Case Study


Chicago Elementary School

Contrary to the belligerent or high-handed architects of engineers’ nightmares, this project was a very smooth and collaborative design process between CCJM Engineers and Legat Architects, along with a number of other consultants who helped guide this project through design and construction, meeting the design and construction schedules and expectations of the Chicago Public Schools and the constructing agency, the Public Building Commission of Chicago. This is currently in the LEED review process for Gold level certification.

The following summarizes the various LEED credits and associated design strategies used to achieve the credits:

WE Credit 3: Water Use Reduction, 30% Reduction

Lee Pasteur will use 0.125 gpf urinals, 1.6 gpf water closets, 0.5 gpm flow controls for the lavatories and wash basins, 1.5 gpm shower flow control, 0.5 gpm sinks, and 2.5 gpm mop receptors. The use of these low-flow fixtures results in a water use reduction of about 35%.

EA Prerequisite 2: Minimum Energy Performance

The project has been designed to comply with the mandatory and prescriptive requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2004.

EA Prerequisite 3: Fundamental Refrigerant Management

No CFC refrigerants are used in the design of the school.

EA Credit 1: Optimize Energy Performance

Whole building energy simulation method was used based on 90.1-2004 Building Performance rating method as per Appendix G. The methodology conforms to the mandatory requirements of sections 5.4, 6.4, 7.4, 8.4, 9.4, and 10.4 of the standard. The various design strategies employed on this project included high-efficiency fenestration and building envelope systems, VFDs on air handling units and pumps, energy recovery units for high outside air handling units serving the gymnasium and cafeteria, condensing boilers (Fig. 6), demand control ventilation, zone level VAV integrated with occupancy, enhanced lighting controls including daylight dimming systems and occupancy sensors, efficient lighting (T8s, moderate LPD), light shelves along the south exposure (Figs. 2, 3, and 4), and reduced fenestration along east and west exposures. The results of these efforts resulted in a building energy model that is 21.5% more efficient than the baseline building.

EA Credit 4: Enhanced Refrigerant Management

The HVAC&R refrigerant that is being used to meet this requirement is 134A. Although 134A has GWP potential, given the efficiency of the design, the overall calculated refrigerant ODP and GWP value is expected to be 98.

IEQ Prerequisite 1: Minimum IAQ Performance

The project will exceed the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1-2004 values for ventilation rates in breathing zones are used in conjunction with the ASHRAE 62.1-2004 occupancy densities. Calculations used the methodology are outlined in Section 6.2 Ventilation Rate Procedure.

IEQ Credit 5: Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control

Where chemical use occurs, including housekeeping areas and copy/printing rooms, deck-to-deck partitions are provided along with separate dedicated outside exhaust at a rate of 0.5 cfm/sq ft. A negative pressure of 0.02 in. of water gauge on average will be maintained. MERV 13 air filters were specified for the air handling units, and filters were changed out prior to building occupancy.

IEQ Credit 6.1: Controllability of Systems, Lighting

Individual lighting control will be provided for 90% of individuals in work spaces. These individual lighting controls consist of plug-in low-voltage task lighting fixtures, which will have individual control. A lumen maintenance system using the daylight dimming system is provided to maintain illuminance at 60 foot-candles for the life of the lamps. The dimming system can be manually operated for A/V mode. Classroom lighting controls have been designed to achieve required results including scenes for general illumination and for A/V illumination. Photocells and occupancy sensors provide general lighting level control while ensuring an efficient use of artificial lighting.

IEQ Credit 6.2: Controllability of Systems, Thermal Comfort

Thermal comfort is maintained for individual thermal comfort in spaces like private offices, open plan workstations, reception stations, and the nurse’s area by providing self-contained modulating VAV boxes to allow temperature resetting for thermal comfort by at least 50% of the occupants. Multi-occupant spaces such as classrooms, gymnasium, library, and dining room are provided with a limited deadband temperature sensor that is accessible to occupants for minor adjustments.

IEQ Credit 7.1: Thermal Comfort, Design

This project complies with ASHRAE 55-2004. Temperature sensors will be set to automatically adjust to respond to winter, summer, and unoccupied conditions. Temperature and humidity control devices are integrated into the BAS to automatically control temperature and, when required, humidity levels.

IEQ Credit 8.1: Daylight and Views

Provide the building occupants with daylight and views into at least 75% of the regularly occupied areas of the building. Over 90% of building spaces have daylight and views.

IEQ Credit 9: Enhanced Acoustical Performance

Contrary to most anecdotes about green roofs, the primary benefit of vegetation on high-performance roofs isn’t necessarily significant improvements in thermal properties, but rather in acoustical insulation. The added mass provides significant acoustical dampening to an otherwise light construction compared to walls. The following photo shows the vegetated roof on the school, which helps attenuate the noise of aircraft whose flight path for landings is very close to the school. While there was significant noise from aircraft on the roof, on the upper floor of the school the noise from aircraft is negligible in part due to the added mass on the roof.

 


--Roy is vice president with CCJM Engineers. He is a cross-disciplinary mechanical engineer who has successfully designed integrated mechanical/electrical systems for LEED-certified schools, as well as commercial, aviation, industrial, and institutional facilities for the past 22 years.


 

Return to:

Designing Efficient Schools: Main Story

Designing Efficient Schools: Design Strategies

Designing Efficient Schools: LEED MEP Related Credits



The Top Plant program honors outstanding manufacturing facilities in North America. View the 2015 Top Plant.
The Product of the Year program recognizes products newly released in the manufacturing industries.
Each year, a panel of Control Engineering and Plant Engineering editors and industry expert judges select the System Integrator of the Year Award winners in three categories.
Doubling down on digital manufacturing; Data driving predictive maintenance; Electric motors and generators; Rewarding operational improvement
2017 Lubrication Guide; Software tools; Microgrids and energy strategies; Use robots effectively
Prescriptive maintenance; Hannover Messe 2017 recap; Reduce welding errors
The cloud, mobility, and remote operations; SCADA and contextual mobility; Custom UPS empowering a secure pipeline
Infrastructure for natural gas expansion; Artificial lift methods; Disruptive technology and fugitive gas emissions
Mobility as the means to offshore innovation; Preventing another Deepwater Horizon; ROVs as subsea robots; SCADA and the radio spectrum
Research team developing Tesla coil designs; Implementing wireless process sensing
Commissioning electrical systems; Designing emergency and standby generator systems; Paralleling switchgear generator systems
Natural gas engines; New applications for fuel cells; Large engines become more efficient; Extending boiler life

Annual Salary Survey

Before the calendar turned, 2016 already had the makings of a pivotal year for manufacturing, and for the world.

There were the big events for the year, including the United States as Partner Country at Hannover Messe in April and the 2016 International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago in September. There's also the matter of the U.S. presidential elections in November, which promise to shape policy in manufacturing for years to come.

But the year started with global economic turmoil, as a slowdown in Chinese manufacturing triggered a worldwide stock hiccup that sent values plummeting. The continued plunge in world oil prices has resulted in a slowdown in exploration and, by extension, the manufacture of exploration equipment.

Read more: 2015 Salary Survey

Maintenance and reliability tips and best practices from the maintenance and reliability coaches at Allied Reliability Group.
The One Voice for Manufacturing blog reports on federal public policy issues impacting the manufacturing sector. One Voice is a joint effort by the National Tooling and Machining...
The Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals an organization devoted...
Join this ongoing discussion of machine guarding topics, including solutions assessments, regulatory compliance, gap analysis...
IMS Research, recently acquired by IHS Inc., is a leading independent supplier of market research and consultancy to the global electronics industry.
Maintenance is not optional in manufacturing. It’s a profit center, driving productivity and uptime while reducing overall repair costs.
The Lachance on CMMS blog is about current maintenance topics. Blogger Paul Lachance is president and chief technology officer for Smartware Group.
The maintenance journey has been a long, slow trek for most manufacturers and has gone from preventive maintenance to predictive maintenance.
Featured articles highlight technologies that enable the Industrial Internet of Things, IIoT-related products and strategies to get data more easily to the user.
This digital report will explore several aspects of how IIoT will transform manufacturing in the coming years.
Maintenance Manager; California Oils Corp.
Associate, Electrical Engineering; Wood Harbinger
Control Systems Engineer; Robert Bosch Corp.
This course focuses on climate analysis, appropriateness of cooling system selection, and combining cooling systems.
This course will help identify and reveal electrical hazards and identify the solutions to implementing and maintaining a safe work environment.
This course explains how maintaining power and communication systems through emergency power-generation systems is critical.
click me