Talk to Me: To Wikileaks or not to Wikileaks

There was a time almost 40 years ago when the ideal of journalism was to hold fast to a standard that said nobody was above the laws of the land. An honorable and noble goal.

02/01/2011


There was a time almost 40 years ago when the ideal of journalism was to hold fast to a standard that said nobody was above the laws of the land. An honorable and noble goal. At its peak, the profession looked at wrong, pointed it out, and then sought avenues to fix the injustice.

The profession helped bring down a President who felt he was above the law. During the entire Watergate investigation, it became clear the President broke laws and the country had a right to know about the ensuing cover up.

Journalists found details, researched and confirmed those details and then wrote stories reporting those details. They didn’t just jump at the first detail and write a story about it; they had to truly research every aspect of the story. Their editors insisted all facts get confirmation by more than one source.

Why take this trip down memory lane? While the media is evolving in this digital era, the tried and true principals still remain: Uncover injustice wherever it exists. How about exposing police brutality in Kenya or learning about innocent victims of war gunned down by the military? The public has a right to know. Dirty secrets cannot, and should not, stay hidden.

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