Industry Voices: Larry Turner

Larry Turner is President and CEO of Hannover Fairs USA, Inc., which provides access and tools that accelerate sales and market penetration through Hannover Fairs International‘s porfolio of global events. He talked about his company’s domestic and global vision with Plant Engineering.

02/18/2013


Q: Assess the state of global manufacturing. What are the strengths and weaknesses in 2013?

Global manufacturing is in a state of transition.  Over the next five years, 20th-century manufacturing powerhouses like the United States, Germany and Japan will be challenged by emerging manufacturing regions, such as Brazil, China and India.   We expect to see European manufacturing will continue to contract in line with Europe’s economic crisis.  In the U.S., we expect modest growth in manufacturing early in 2013 due to our continued sluggish economy but expect things to pick up in the second half of 2013.

Global manufacturers who embrace high technology and innovative manufacturing techniques, such as the technologies and solutions on display at HANNOVER MESSE 2013, will be able to grow their business through this transition.   

Q: While manufacturing issues differ from region to region and economy to economy, what do they have in common?

Integrated industry, the theme of Hannover Messe 2013, runs across all regions and economies.  Intelligent networking of work pieces, components and machines, as well as communication across industry and enterprise is a major need around the globe.

No matter where you are in the world, global competition in the manufacturing industry is on the rise.  All manufacturers strive to please the customer and provide excellent service/products while doing so efficiently and cost effectively.  Hannover Fairs manufacturing and industrial automation fair attendees can access the latest technological advancements to help them stay ahead of global competitors. 

Manufacturers around the globe must maintain working capital, product quality and availability.  Lean manufacturing is increasing worldwide, as well, due to greater demand for sustainable solutions/resource efficiency and innovation. These are all universal priorities when it comes to manufacturing and all themes of discussion at Hannnover Messe this year.  

We also see commonality across supply chains that are becoming more complex as they stretch across the globe, introducing manufacturers to new risks that must be managed.   Government regulations must also be taken into consideration when accessing new markets.  These are instances where Hannover Fairs global manufacturing brand of trade shows can help.  Attendees have access to leading international market leaders in numerous industrial sectors.  Networking with Government representatives of various regions, policy makers and trade and industry specialists keeps manufacturers informed.

Also with a more globalized world, IP protection in the technology/manufacturing industry is becoming a priority due to the cross-border sharing of knowledge and resources.  Companies around the globe are working hard to introduce products to the market faster while ensuring the protection of their IP/patents.

Access to talented workers continues to be another key to manufacturing success in every region of the world.  Hannover Fairs offers candidates and companies a forum to meet and discuss potential job offers.

Q: What factors outside of government will continue to affect manufacturing in 2013?

Globalization will continue to increase competition and introduce new competitors, such as increased growth in Asia and South America.  Other specific factors include:

  • Supply chain risk management
  • Social media will become more of  a collaborative tool in manufacturing – connecting enterprise to end user
  • Big data will allow companies to store and process more information, providing new insights
  • As financial and environmental cost of energy increases, manufacturers around the world will need to develop sustainable technologies and production methods
  • Availability of capital and loans to SME’s at a reasonable rate will affect manufacturing
  • The slow rise in consumer confidence
  • Availability of skilled workers
  • Natural/man-made disasters like hurricane Sandy, Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, floods in Thailand, etc. will continue to impact the global/regional supply chains


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