Managing the DCS upgrade

The right process can take out the guesswork and lead to a successful migration.

02/13/2014


The goal in most DCS migrations today is incremental improvement in the system. Courtesy: OptimationAs distributed control system manufacturers evolved and their products and solutions became less attractive due to their proprietary nature, cost, and most importantly, lack of support and availability, customers began to look for viable replacement strategies. Many “hybrid” DCS platforms and advanced process controllers began to market replacement programs for legacy, monolithic DCS systems in manageable and cost-effective slices.

Today one can choose to replace only the I/O, or only the processors or only the HMI, or combinations of the aforementioned, without full-scale demolition and fabrication of a new system. This may reduce the actual installation timeline and costs of each phase of a DCS upgrade.

Proper planning, definition of project team roles, and testing are vital to take the headache out of a DCS migration project. 

Make it more manageable

I/O migrations can be accomplished by providing an upgrade to the I/O structure and devices which would leverage the current I/O termination points, eliminating the need to disturb or rewire the existing field connections. Several manufacturers offer I/O and terminations that are simply a “bolt-on” upgrade and provide backplane or native communications to the original processors. Little or no software changes are needed, and the field wiring and installation requirements are minimal.

Because I/O modules and devices are typically still available from the OEM, and unless there is a shortage or the OEM no longer exists, this upgrade is not critical.

Although replacing the processing units usually is done at the same time as I/O migration, it’s not absolutely necessary. Some manufacturers offer processor upgrades that will still continue to communicate to the original I/O structures, even if those structures are from another manufacturer.

Software services are required for this upgrade, which can vary from automatic control program upgrades (usually requires some manual verification and tweaking) to complete rewrites of the control programs. An experienced systems integrator can determine the proper approach.

A processor upgrade may require an HMI upgrade, as the processor may now have a different communications protocol and naming structure for the tags or control blocks being used at the HMI.

Typical DCS communications are proprietary and serial (such as Modbus), but usually do not cover any recent (past 20 years) protocols like Fieldbus or various Ethernet protocols.

Most plants today are looking for fractional improvements to current systems. From a controls perspective, the DCS does a great job in handling various control loops and other control schemes, but original DCS tools make advanced data mining and manufacturing intelligence unavailable or difficult to obtain and analyze.

The tools best suited for these tasks run on open architectures (like Windows) and require robust connectivity to the SCADA/HMI, I/O services, or databases.

Additional considerations

Most typical DCS installations contain additional controllers, consisting of a variety of PLCs and single loop devices, which currently possess limited or no connectivity to the DCS. This produces an HMI environment that may be blind to some portion of the plant and may require additional HMI products to view those data types.

Some DCS manufacturers no longer exist, or their product line has been discontinued for many years. In these cases, customers have relied on third-party electrical repair houses, surplus and reclaimed electronic stores, or even eBay for replacement parts. Software upgrades are virtually nonexistent and may not be a required purchase, but support of those products is spotty at best.

Most DCS legacy HMI screens are visualized as 2-dimensional vector-based graphics. In today’s world of high definition, realistic animation, and video games, these old HMI systems truly show their age and antiquated level of technology. Although most operators of these systems have grown accustomed to their generally flat colorless interface, far more information can be displayed through new high-definition graphics, increasing operator comprehension without producing information overload. 


<< First < Previous 1 2 Next > Last >>

No comments
The Top Plant program honors outstanding manufacturing facilities in North America. View the 2015 Top Plant.
The Product of the Year program recognizes products newly released in the manufacturing industries.
The Engineering Leaders Under 40 program identifies and gives recognition to young engineers who...
World-class maintenance: The three keys to success - Deploy people, process and technology; 2016 Lubrication Guide; Why hydraulic systems get hot
Your leaks start here: Take a disciplined approach with your hydraulic system; U.S. presence at Hannover Messe a rousing success
Hannover Messe 2016: Taking hold of the future - Partner Country status spotlights U.S. manufacturing; Honoring manufacturing excellence: The 2015 Product of the Year Winners
The digital oilfield: Utilizing Big Data can yield big savings; Virtualization a real solution; Tracking SIS performance
Getting to the bottom of subsea repairs: Older pipelines need more attention, and operators need a repair strategy; OTC preview; Offshore production difficult - and crucial
Digital oilfields: Integrated HMI/SCADA systems enable smarter data acquisition; Real-world impact of simulation; Electric actuator technology prospers in production fields
Improving flowmeter calibration; Selecting flowmeters for natural gas; Case study: Streamlining assembly systems using PC-based control; CLPM: Improving process efficiency, throughput
Putting COPS into context; Designing medium-voltage electrical systems; Planning and designing resilient, efficient data centers; The nine steps of designing generator fuel systems
Warehouse winter comfort: The HTHV solution; Cooling with natural gas; Plastics industry booming

Annual Salary Survey

Before the calendar turned, 2016 already had the makings of a pivotal year for manufacturing, and for the world.

There were the big events for the year, including the United States as Partner Country at Hannover Messe in April and the 2016 International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago in September. There's also the matter of the U.S. presidential elections in November, which promise to shape policy in manufacturing for years to come.

But the year started with global economic turmoil, as a slowdown in Chinese manufacturing triggered a worldwide stock hiccup that sent values plummeting. The continued plunge in world oil prices has resulted in a slowdown in exploration and, by extension, the manufacture of exploration equipment.

Read more: 2015 Salary Survey

Maintenance and reliability tips and best practices from the maintenance and reliability coaches at Allied Reliability Group.
The One Voice for Manufacturing blog reports on federal public policy issues impacting the manufacturing sector. One Voice is a joint effort by the National Tooling and Machining...
The Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals an organization devoted...
Join this ongoing discussion of machine guarding topics, including solutions assessments, regulatory compliance, gap analysis...
IMS Research, recently acquired by IHS Inc., is a leading independent supplier of market research and consultancy to the global electronics industry.
Maintenance is not optional in manufacturing. It’s a profit center, driving productivity and uptime while reducing overall repair costs.
The Lachance on CMMS blog is about current maintenance topics. Blogger Paul Lachance is president and chief technology officer for Smartware Group.
This article collection contains several articles on the vital role that compressed air plays in manufacturing plants.
This article collection contains several articles on the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and how it is transforming manufacturing.
This article collection contains several articles on strategic maintenance and understanding all the parts of your plant.
click me